Journal cover Journal topic
Journal of Micropalaeontology An open-access journal of The Micropalaeontological Society
J. Micropalaeontol., 37, 191-194, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/jm-37-191-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
17 Jan 2018
Improved wet splitter for micropalaeontological analysis, and assessment of uncertainty using data from splitters
Laurie M. Charrieau1,2, Lene Bryngemark3, Ingemar Hansson1, and Helena L. Filipsson1 1Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden
2Department of Environmental Science, Lund University, Sweden
3Department of Physics, Lund University, Sweden
Abstract. Analyses of foraminiferal assemblages have often been implemented on dry samples, which are easy to split. In some cases, the wet-picking method is preferred as it allows the preservation of more foraminiferal forms and facilitates the picking of live foraminifera. However, the increased execution time needed for wet picking may cause micropalaeontologists to refrain from employing it in a routine way. Here we present an improved and cost-effective wet splitter (including a 3-D printing file) for micropalaeontological samples aimed to reduce picking time while keeping information loss to a minimum. We demonstrate small sample losses as well as statistical consistency across splits. We show that the time saved picking a subset will always be larger than the relative increase in statistical uncertainty.

Citation: Charrieau, L. M., Bryngemark, L., Hansson, I., and Filipsson, H. L.: Improved wet splitter for micropalaeontological analysis, and assessment of uncertainty using data from splitters, J. Micropalaeontol., 37, 191-194, https://doi.org/10.5194/jm-37-191-2018, 2018.
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Short summary
Splitting samples into smaller subsamples is often necessary in micropalaeontological studies. Indeed, the general high abundance of microfossils – which makes them excellent tools to reconstruct past environments – also results in very time-consuming faunal analyses. Here we present an improved and cost-effective wet splitter for micropalaeontological samples aimed to reduce picking time, while keeping information loss to a minimum.
Splitting samples into smaller subsamples is often necessary in micropalaeontological studies....
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